Star Food

Chickpea: its great contributions to your health

Chickpea: its great contributions to your health

Chickpea stands out among traditional legumes for its contribution of slowly absorbed carbohydrates, which provide energy.

It is an essential food in a healthy and balanced diet. Here are some of its many nutritional properties:

Chickpeas provide complex, slow-absorbing carbohydrates. They are the most recommended, since they produce a gradual assimilation of glucose. This prevents the imbalance of blood sugar levels and generates constant energy.

They provide a large amount of protein but at the same time are very low in saturated fat, so they help regulate cholesterol. By combining chickpeas with cereals (rice, couscous ...) the quality of their proteins improves.

They provide significant amounts of fiber, which improves intestinal transit and also contributes to a slower absorption of carbohydrates.

Chickpeas provide many minerals, especially phosphorus, iron and magnesium.

They are especially rich in vitamins B1, B6, and folic acid.

Main indications

Chickpea is a food suitable for all types of people, but in some cases its consumption is more convenient.

Its contribution of carbohydrates and proteins make it very suitable for states of asthenia, children, adolescents and people who make physical efforts, such as athletes.

Due to its high potassium content and the low presence of sodium, chickpea promotes diuresis or urine excretion. This is beneficial in cases of high blood pressure, kidney stones and when you want to eliminate an excess of uric acid.

Chickpea is stomachic, good for the stomach. Due to its richness in fiber, it also helps the functions of the intestine, fighting constipation and intestinal parasites.

Due to its remarkable content of magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins, necessary for the nervous and muscular system, chickpea is suitable for dealing with situations of psychophysical tension and stress.

A renewed classic

Chickpea offers many possibilities in the kitchen. As a legume, it allows the preparation of very diverse and consistent dishes, from winter stews and stews to summer salads.

Chickpea is credited with causing flatulence.

To avoid them, once cooked, it is advisable to mash the skin of the chickpeas using a masher. Another way to aid digestion is to add a piece of kombu seaweed or some herb with carminative properties such as sage, thyme, coriander, savory or cumin to the cooking water.

In addition to being cooked, chickpeas can also be eaten sprouted, in refreshing salads, or even roasted, in a pan or baked, as an aperitif or a snack.

Chickpeas are used to prepare other delicious recipes, such as the traditional hummus or chickpea paté, very popular in the Middle East.

Falafels, a popular recipe among Jews and Arabs, are fried balls made from chickpeas, onion, garlic, parsley, and coriander.

Daniel Bonet (health) and Santi Ávalos (kitchen)

Video: Dukkah Chickpea Salad with Sue Armstrong (October 2020).