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Beer could be in short supply due to climate change

Beer could be in short supply due to climate change

A new study published inNature Plantswarns of the consequences of climate change on the production of barley, a central ingredient in beer production.

Droughts and heat waves

Researchers from the University of California-Irvine (UCI) conclude in their study that concurrent droughts and heat waves, exacerbated by anthropogenic global warming, will affect the yields of barley, one of the main ingredients for making beer. .

The decrease in yields is calculated between 3 to 17% and will mainly affect the final prices of beer.

As study co-author Steven Davis, associate professor of Earth System Sciences at UCI, explains:

The world faces many life-threatening impacts of climate change, so the fact that people have to spend a little more to drink beer may seem trivial in comparison. But there is definitely a cross-cultural appeal to beer, and not having a fresh pint at the end of an increasingly common hot day simply adds to injury.

Only 17 percent of the world's barley is used in brewing beer; the rest is used as feed for livestock. That is to say.

Our results show that, in the most severe weather events, beer supply could decline by around 16 percent in years with droughts and heat waves. That is comparable to all beer consumption in America. Future weather and price conditions could put beer out of reach for hundreds of millions of people around the world.

Impacts of climate change

"The world faces many life-threatening impacts of climate change, so the fact that people have to spend a little more to drink beer may seem trivial in comparison," says co-author Steven Davis, associate professor. of Sciences of the Terrestrial System of the UCI–. But there is definitely a cross-cultural appeal to beer, and not having a fresh pint at the end of an increasingly common hot day just adds to the injury. "

"Current levels of fossil fuel consumption and CO2 pollution, as usual, will lead to this worst-case scenario, with more climatic extremes negatively affecting the world's beer basket," warns co-author Nathan Mueller, assistant professor. Science Fiction of the Earth System of the UCI. "Our study showed that even moderate warming will lead to increased drought and excessive heat events in barley growing areas," he adds.

With information from:

Video: Climate change and its impact on craft beer (October 2020).