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Soy, deforestation and drug trafficking expel natives to cities

Soy, deforestation and drug trafficking expel natives to cities

“A situation of generalized lack of protection of the rights of indigenous peoples over their lands, territories and resources has been verified (…). The Government of Paraguay must consider the current situation as an emergency ”, reads the summary of its report prepared at the request of the UN General Assembly.

Due to the lack of economic alternatives and the extreme poverty in which they subsist, the indigenous communities live captive to the agricultural production model, the narco advance and the absence of the State that increases the indigenous diaspora towards the cities. These are the “main threats” that threaten native peoples, shares Tina Alvarenga, advisor to the current presidency of the Paraguayan Indigenous Institute (Indi).

She accompanied - she says - the United Nations rapporteur, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, who came in November 2014 to carry out a diagnosis of the situation in which the natives find themselves. He toured communities in the Eastern and Western regions.

“A situation of generalized lack of protection of the rights of indigenous peoples over their lands, territories and resources has been verified (…). The Government of Paraguay must consider the current situation as an emergency ”, reads the summary of its report prepared at the request of the UN General Assembly.

He mentions the current threats: "Territorial invasions, the development model that has been implemented", distinguishes Alvarenga.

In his opinion, the pressing situation of indigenous people on the streets has its structural basis in "soybeanization, the agricultural model, deforestation and drug trafficking."

“The issue is that the best lands still belong to indigenous territories and are highly sought after by various actors: be it for crops of whatever type, I don't go in to carve what kind. Or in the case of the Chaco, deforestation ”, says the indigenous advisor of the Western Guaraní ethnic group.

"If they continue to expel, the problem (of the natives on the street) will continue to reproduce," he observes, adding that there are reports from various social organizations that point to the former Secretary of the Environment (Seam, now the Ministry) as an accomplice of deforestation.

"This puts indigenous populations at risk because they cannot access their food, their livelihoods and less and less can enter to dispose of their raw material for handicrafts in the case of women," he says.


Beaten:

The Mbya Guaraní people are the most affected by the evil of drugs and the expulsion from the countryside to the city. “From a life in abundance, they are now off their lands and are given no alternatives. Itaipu, for example, how much land did it take from the Mbya. The same Yacyretá ”, denounces and affirms that the State still owes compensation to that town.

“What we see there - he points out to the natives in street situations - is the result of abandonment and expulsion from their lands and territories in the 80s and 90s; and there is still expulsion. This has been dragging on and it is only a consequence of not having compensated those peoples.

It reinforces that no megaproject has so far made an impact assessment on human rights. "This look gives a holistic, comprehensive vision of how any type of small, medium or large initiative can affect people," he says.

Query:

Just this year, Indi began the process of consulting community leaders for the preparation of the National Plan for Public Policies for the sector and "all these threats have been avoided." There are only six consultations left - Tina mentions - to have the complete picture, which "is going to be the best photograph of the specific situation of indigenous peoples." He estimates that the document will be released in October.

Video: Tropicality, Tropicalism: Forest Resurgence and the Politics of Latin American Conservation (October 2020).