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Deforestation in the Amazon, reaching the point of no return

Deforestation in the Amazon, reaching the point of no return

Deforestation of the Amazon rainforest could be irreversible. In the last 50 years, it has affected almost 17% of its vegetation, approaching a point of no return.

For this reason, a team of scientists urgently proposes to reforest the southeast of the Amazon.

The journal Science Advances warns about this problem in an article by the American Thomas Lovejoy and the Brazilian, Carlos Nobre, Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.

"If the climate changes - due to deforestation or global warming - there is a risk that more than 50% of the Amazon rainforest will lead to a degraded, low-biodiversity, savanna-like landscape," says the scientific researcher, Carlos Nobre.

Biologists warn of the risks posed by climate change and the use of fire by farmers that affect the natural cycle of rains in the region.

“The fact that deforestation continues to occur shows, in some way, the difficulty and almost bankruptcy of representative democracy in our South American countries. Representative democracy no longer works in Brazil. And the will of the majority of Brazilians to preserve the Amazon is not reflected in the political actions coming from Brasilia and the Brazilian states ”.

The forests contribute to greater evaporation and higher atmospheric humidity essential for rain in the central and eastern sector of the Amazon. The decrease in rainfall is already noticeable in a longer dry season.

Researchers believe that recent droughts in Brazil in 2005, 2010 and 2015 could well represent the first signs of this ecological tipping point.


Video: The Amazon isnt Burning - Its Being Burned (October 2020).